Harry Boland

photo of Harry Boland and Michael Collins

Harry Boland and Michael Collins

On the anniversary of Harry Boland’s controversial shooting, some excerpts from the book’s chapter re-examining Boland’s life & death, and its close connection with Collins’.

Harry Boland TD, a Volunteer since 1913, was a close friend and associate of Collins and, like him, a member of the IRB’s Supreme Council. He played a leading role in the War of Independence, and would have been expected to hold a Cabinet seat or other high office in the post-war government. Boland’s death took place in the very opening days of the civil conflict, before it had really developed into all-out war. According to Deasy, it was attended by “mysterious circumstances” and “was another serious blow to the moderate wing” of the anti-Treaty side. That is, it drove another nail into the coffin of hopes for a swift reunification of the victorious War of Independence army. …

The end of … Harry Boland, a national hero, so closely associated with Michael Collins, deserves much more anxious scrutiny, than it has yet been accorded.

Read more:

“The Assassination of Michael Collins:
What Happened At Béal na mBláth?”
by S M Sigerson
Book cover image - The Assassination of Michael Collins - What Happened at Béal na mBláth
Paperback or Kindle edition here:

www.amazon.com/dp/1493784714

For all other e-reader formats:
www.smashwords.com/books/view/433954

Read more about Harry Boland:
http://www.corkuniversitypress.com/Harry-Bolands-Irish-Revolution-p/9781859183861.htm
cover image - Harry Boland's Irish Revolution

 

 

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Revolution and democracy

Painting of the taking of the Bastille in 1789

The taking of the Bastille prison 1789

In honour of Bastille Day, some excerpts from the book examine the nature of modern republican revolutions, and the states they’ve give birth to.

 

“The debate is over: Statistics show that modern democracies, governed on principles of universal human / civil rights, the rule of law and separation of powers, are the most successful form of government. Such republics tend to be more prosperous and more stable than autocracies. Countries where the public has a powerful voice in decision-making are dramatically less likely to go to war, or to deteriorate into anarchy. Such stability fosters more flourishing trade, health, industry, learning and generally enhanced cultural and economic development, over longer sustained periods.

 

“The larger picture of republican revolutions in world history is very much a work in progress. We, the natives of modern Western democracies are the living products of that political maelstrom: the ending of which has yet to be written. What John Stuart Mill called the great modern social and spiritual transition. In this greater ongoing process, Ireland is indubitably a success story, not a failure.

 

I may not get there with you. But we, as a people, are going to make it to the Promised Land. 

– Martin Luther King (on the eve of his assassination)

 

“The leaders of great revolutionary struggles often do not live to see the fulfilment of their own handiwork. That is an occupational hazard. One which they all accept at the very outset. One which Collins, judging from his own words on the subject, was thoroughly prepared for every day.

 

“All great leaders of this kind take on a very old system: an ancient imperialist war and political machine, oiled by centuries’ experience in putting down popular revolutions. And in eliminating great popular leaders.”

 

Read more:

“The Assassination of Michael Collins:
What Happened At Béal na mBláth?”
by S M Sigerson

Paperback or Kindle edition here:
www.amazon.com/dp/1493784714

For all other e-reader formats:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/433954

 Or ask at your local bookshop

also see: http://bastille-day.com/

How and Why Did the Civil War Start?

photo of bombardment of Four Courts 1922

The Four Courts siege 1922

28 June marks the commencement of the Civil War in Ireland, 1922-23.

 

A chapter in the book examines these events, which directly led to the death of Collins

 

The Civil War by no means broke out instantaneously or thoughtlessly. Tremendous efforts were carried on, for months on end, to avert the outbreak of hostilities. … Many strove desparately to find some means of going forward without civil conflict.

 

… No war ever begins for just one reason. All the factors set forth so far … may be seen as a powder keg: the explosive elements which placed the country in danger of war breaking out. In that sense, the occupation of Four Courts was the fuse, and the assassination of Sir Henry Wilson the spark, which together set off the conflagration; which cost so many lives, and broke out afresh in the northern Troubles of the 1970s – 1990s.”

 

Read more:

 

 “The Assassination of Michael Collins:
What Happened At Béal na mBláth?”
by S M Sigerson

 

Paperback or Kindle edition here:
www.amazon.com/dp/1493784714

 

For all other e-reader formats:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/433954